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the Looking-Glass, by Lewis Carroll

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Title: Songs From Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

Author: Lewis Carroll

Illustrator: Charles Folkard

Release Date: June 2, 2011 [EBook #36308]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SONGS FROM ALICE IN WONDERLAND ***




Produced by David Edwards, Linda Cantoni, and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This
file was produced from images generously made available
by The Internet Archive.) Music transcribed by Linda
Cantoni.






Transcriber's Note: Click on the [Listen] link to hear the music (midi). Click on the [XML] link to view or download the music notation in MusicXML format. Click on the [PDF] link to view, download, or print sheet music in PDF format.

CONTENTS
ILLUSTRATIONS

SONGS FROM
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
AND
THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS

cover

[Enlarge]

WORDS BY LEWIS CARROLL
MUSIC BY LUCY E. BROADWOOD
ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHARLES FOLKARD


A Mad Tea-party

[Enlarge]


SONGS FROM
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
AND
THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS

WORDS BY LEWIS CARROLL
MUSIC BY LUCY E. BROADWOOD
ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHARLES FOLKARD

The White Rabbit

A. & C. BLACK, LTD., 4, 5 & 6, SOHO SQUARE, LONDON, W. 1.


This Book is published by kind permission of
Messrs. Macmillan & Co., Ltd.

Published, October, 1921.


A mouse in a teapot

Contents.

SONGS FROM ALICE IN WONDERLAND. 
 PAGE
How doth the little Crocodile11
You are Old, Father William13
Twinkle, twinkle, little Bat!15
Pig and Pepper17
The Lobster Quadrille19
'Tis the Voice of the Lobster21
Beautiful Soup23
The Queen of Hearts24
Who Stole the Tarts?25
SONGS FROM THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS. 
Jabberwocky29
Tweedledum and Tweedledee31
The Walrus and the Carpenter33
Humpty, Dumpty35
The Message to the Fish37
The Lion and the Unicorn39
The Aged, Aged Man41
Queen Alice45
The Fish Riddle47
Hush-a-by, Lady48

It has been found necessary to slightly alter the original arrangement of the songs; "Pig and Pepper" and "Twinkle, twinkle, little Bat!" have been transposed, and "Hush-a-by, Lady" has been placed last instead of before "Queen Alice."


OFF WITH HIS HEAD


ILLUSTRATIONS IN COLOUR
BY
CHARLES FOLKARD.

A Mad Tea-partyFrontispiece
 PAGE
Yet you balance an Eel on the end of your Nose12
Speak roughly to your little Boy16
The Lobster Quadrille18
Beautiful Soup22
He took his Vorpal Sword in Hand28
The Walrus and the Carpenter32
I went and shouted in his Ear36
I look for Butterflies that sleep among the Wheat40
Then fill up the Glasses with Treacle and Ink44
The Fish Riddle46
Alice and her FriendsOn the Cover

Cards painting the roses


DRINK ME


SONGS FROM ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Songs from
Alice in Wonderland


The Little Crocodile


-11-

How doth the little Crocodile

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On ev'ry golden scale!
How cheerfully he seems to grin,
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in
With gently smiling jaws!

-12-

Yet you balance an Eel on the end of your Nose

[Enlarge]


-13-

You are old, Father William

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

"You are old, Father William," the young man said,
"And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
Do you think, at your age, it is right?"

"In my youth," Father William replied to his son,
"I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why I do it again and again."

-14-

music

"You are old," said the youth, "as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
Pray, what is the reason of that?"

"In my youth," said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
"I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment—one shilling the box—
Allow me to sell you a couple."

"You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
Pray, how did you manage to do it?"

"In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life."

"You are old," said the youth; "one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balance an eel on the end of your nose—
What made you so awfully clever?"

"I have answered three questions, and that is enough,"
Said his father; "don't give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs!"

-15-

Twinkle, twinkle, little Bat

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

Twinkle, twinkle, little bat!
How I wonder what you're at!
Up above the world you fly,
Like a tea-tray in the sky!

-16-

Speak roughly to your little Boy

[Enlarge]


-17-

Pig and Pepper

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

"Speak roughly to your little boy,
And beat him when he sneezes;
He only does it to annoy,
Because he knows it teases."
Wow! Wow! Wow!

"I speak severely to my boy,
I beat him when he sneezes;
For he can thoroughly enjoy
The pepper when he pleases."
Wow! Wow! Wow!

-18-

The Lobster Quadrille

[Enlarge]


-19-

The Lobster Quadrille

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

"Will you walk a little faster?" said a whiting to a snail,
"There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail.
See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!
They are waiting on the shingle—will you come and join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance?"

-20-

music

"You can really have no notion how delightful it will be
When they take us up and throw us, with the lobsters, out to sea!"
But the snail replied, "Too far, too far!" and gave a look askance—
Said he thanked the whiting kindly, but he would not join the dance.
Would not, could not, would not, could not, would not join the dance.
Would not, could not, would not, could not, could not join the dance.

"What matters it how far we go?" his scaly friend replied;
"There is another shore, you know, upon the other side.
The further off from England the nearer is to France—
Then turn not pale, belovèd snail, but come and join the dance.
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance?"

-21-

’Tis the Voice of the Lobster

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

'Tis the voice of the lobster; I heard him declare,
"You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair."
As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose
Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.

-22-

Beautiful Soup

[Enlarge]


-23-

Beautiful Soup

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

Beautiful soup, so rich and green,
Waiting in a hot tureen!
Who for such dainties would not stoop?
Soup of the ev'ning, beautiful soup!
Soup of the ev'ning, beautiful soup!
Beautiful soo-oop!
Beautiful soo-oop!
Soo-oop of the e-e-ev'ning,
Beautiful, beautiful soo-oo-oop!

"Beautiful soup! Who cares for fish,
Game, or any other dish?
Who would not give all else for two p-
ennyworth only of beautiful soup!
Pennyworth only of beautiful soup!
Beautiful soo-oop!
Beautiful soo-oop!
Soo-oop of the e-e-ev'ning,
Beautiful, beautiful soo-oo-oop!"

Transcriber's Note: The hyphen at the end of the third line of the second verse is deliberate in the original, so that "two p-" pronounced as one syllable rhymes with "soup."


-24-

The Queen of Hearts

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts,
All on a summer day:
The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts,
And took them quite away!

-25-

Who stole the Tarts

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

They told me you had been to her,
And mentioned me to him:
She gave me a good character,
But said I could not swim.

He sent them word I had not gone
(We know it to be true):
If she should push the matter on,
What would become of you?

I gave her one, they gave him two,
You gave us three or more;
They all returned from him to you,
Though they were mine before.

If I or she should chance to be
Involved in this affair,
He trusts to you to set them free,
Exactly as we were.

My notion was that you had been
(Before she had this fit)
An obstacle that came between
Him, and ourselves, and it.

Don't let him know she liked them best,
For this must ever be
A secret, kept from all the rest,
Between yourself and me.

-26-

chessman


-27-

SONGS FROM THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS

Songs from
Through the Looking-Glass


-28-

He took his Vorpal Sword in Hand

[Enlarge]


-29-

Jabberwocky

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

-30-

music

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came.

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?—
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

-31-

Tweedledum and Tweedledee

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

Tweedledum and Tweedledee
Agreed to have a battle;
For Tweedledum said Tweedledee
Had spoiled his nice new rattle.

Just then flew down a monstrous crow,
As black as a tar barrel;
Which frightened both the heroes so,
They quite forgot their quarrel.

-32-

The Walrus and the Carpenter

[Enlarge]


-33-

The Walrus and the Carpenter

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright—
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no bus'ness to be there
After the day was done—
"It's very rude of him," she said,
"To come and spoil the fun!"

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead—
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand;
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
"If this were only cleared away,"
They said, "it would be grand!"

"If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year,
Do you suppose," the Walrus said,
"That they could get it clear?"
"I doubt it," said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

"O, Oysters, come and walk with us!"
The Walrus did beseech,
"A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each."

The eldest Oyster looked at him,
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head—
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

But four young Oysters hurried up,
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat—
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn't any feet!

Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more—
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.

-34-

music

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low;
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

"The time has come," the Walrus said,
"To talk of many things:
Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
Of cabbages—and kings—
And why the sea is boiling hot—
And whether pigs have wings."

"But wait a bit," the Oysters cried,
"Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!"
"No hurry," said the Carpenter:
They thanked him much for that.

"A loaf of bread," the Walrus said,
"Is chiefly what we need:
Pepper and vinegar, besides,
Are very good indeed—
Now, if you're ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed."

"But not on us!" the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue.
"After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!"
"The night is fine," the Walrus said.
"Do you admire the view?"

"It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!"
The Carpenter said nothing, but
"Cut us another slice:
I wish you were not quite so deaf—
I've had to ask you twice!"

"It seems a shame," the Walrus said,
"To play them such a trick,
After we've brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!"
The Carpenter said nothing, but
"The butter's spread too thick!"

"I weep for you," the Walrus said:
"I deeply sympathize."
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size,
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

"Oh, Oysters," said the Carpenter,
"You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?"
But answer came there none—
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one.

-35-

Humpty Dumpty

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall:
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the King's horses and all the King's men
Couldn't put Humpty Dumpty in his place again.

-36-

I went and shouted in his Ear

[Enlarge]


-37-

The Message to the Fish

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

In winter, when the fields are white,
I sing this song for your delight—

In spring, when woods are getting green,
I'll try and tell you what I mean.

In summer, when the days are long,
Perhaps you'll understand the song:

In autumn, when the leaves are brown,
Take pen and ink, and write it down.

-38-

music

I sent a message to the fish:
I told them "This is what I wish."

The little fishes of the sea
They sent an answer back to me.

The little fishes' answer was
"We cannot do it, sir, because—"

I sent to them again to say
"It will be better to obey."

The fishes answered, with a grin,
"Why, what a temper you are in!"

I told them once, I told them twice:
They would not listen to advice.

I took a kettle large and new,
Fit for the deed I had to do.

My heart went hop, my heart went thump;
I filled the kettle at the pump.

Then some one came to me, and said,
"The little fishes are in bed."

I said to him, I said it plain,
"Then you must wake them up again."

I said it very loud and clear;
I went and shouted in his ear.

But he was very stiff and proud;
He said, "You needn't shout so loud!"

And he was very proud and stiff;
He said, "I'd go and wake them, if—"

I took a corkscrew from the shelf:
I went to wake them up myself.

And when I found the door was locked,
I pulled and pushed, and kicked and knocked.

And when I found the door was shut,
I tried to turn the handle, but—

-39-

The Lion and the Unicorn

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

The Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the Crown:
The Lion beat the Unicorn all round the town.
Some gave them white bread, some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum cake, and drummed them out of town.

-40-

I look for Butterflies that sleep among the Wheat

[Enlarge]


-41-

The Aged, Aged Man

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

Tune "I give thee all, I can no more," adapted by T. Moore
from H. Bishop, arranged by L. Broadwood.

music

I'll tell thee ev'rything I can;
There's little to relate.
I saw an aged, aged man,
A-sitting on a gate.
"Who are you, aged man?" I said.
"And how is it you live?"
And his answer trickled through my head
Like water through a sieve.

He said, "I look for butterflies
That sleep among the wheat:
I make them into mutton pies,
And sell them in the street.
I sell them unto men," he said,
"Who sail on stormy seas;
And that's the way I get my bread—
A trifle, if you please."

But I was thinking of a plan
To dye one's whiskers green,
And always use so large a fan
That they should not be seen.
So, having no reply to give
To what the old man said,
I cried, "Come, tell me how you live!"
And thumped him on the head.

His accents mild took up the tale:
He said "I go my ways,
And when I find a mountain rill,
I set it in a blaze;
And thence they make a stuff they call
Rowlands' Macassar Oil—
Yet two-pence-halfpenny is all
They give me for my toil!"

But I was thinking of a way
To feed oneself on batter,
And so go on from day to day
Getting a little fatter.
I shook him well from side to side,
Until his face was blue:
"Come, tell me how you live," I cried,
"And what it is you do!"

-42-

music

He said, "I hunt for haddocks' eyes
Among the heather bright,
And work them into waistcoat-buttons
In the silent night.
And these I do not sell for gold
Or coin of silv'ry shine,
But for a copper halfpenny,
And that will purchase nine."

"I sometimes dig for buttered rolls,
Or set limed twigs for crabs;
I sometimes search the grassy knolls
For wheels of Hansom-cabs!
And that's the way" (he gave a wink)
"By which I get my wealth—
And very gladly will I drink
Your honour's noble health."

I heard him then, for I had just
Completed my design
To keep the Menai bridge from rust
By boiling it in wine.
I thanked him much for telling me
The way he got his wealth,
But chiefly for his wish that he
Might drink my noble health.

-43-

music

And now, if e'er by chance I put
My fingers into glue,
Or madly squeeze a right-hand foot
Into a left-hand shoe,
Or if I drop upon my toe
A very heavy weight,
I weep, for it reminds me so
Of that old man I used to know—
Whose look was mild, whose speech was slow,
Whose hair was whiter than the snow,
Whose face was very like a crow,
With eyes, like cinders, all a-glow,
Who seem'd distracted with his woe,
Who rocked his body to and fro,
And muttered mumblingly and low,
As if his mouth were full of dough;
Who snorted like a buffalo
That summer ev'ning, long ago,
A-sitting on a gate!

-44-

Then fill up the Glasses with Treacle and Ink

[Enlarge]


-45-

Queen Alice

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said,
"I've a sceptre in hand, I've a crown on my head;
Let the Looking-Glass creatures, whatever they be,
Come and dine with the Red Queen, the White Queen, and me!"

Then fill up the glasses as quick as you can,
And sprinkle the table with buttons and bran:
Put cats in the coffee, and mice in the tea—
And welcome Queen Alice with thirty-times-three!

"Oh, Looking-Glass creatures," quoth Alice, "draw near!
'Tis an honour to see me, a favour to hear:
'Tis a privilege high to have dinner and tea
Along with the Red Queen, the White Queen, and me!"

Then fill up the glasses with treacle and ink,
Or anything else that is pleasant to drink;
Mix sand with the cider, and wool with the wine—
And welcome Queen Alice with ninety-times-nine!

-46-

The Fish Riddle

[Enlarge]


-47-

The Fish Riddle

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

1. "First, the fish must be caught."
That is easy: a baby, I think, could have caught it.
"Next, the fish must be bought."
That is easy: a penny, I think, would have bought it.
"Now, cook me the fish!"
That is easy, and will not take more than a minute.
"Let it lie in a dish!"
That is easy, because it already is in it!

2. "Bring it here! Let me sup!"
It is easy to set such a dish on the table.
"Take the dish-cover up!"
Ah, that is so hard that I fear I'm unable!
For it holds it like glue—
Holds the lid to the dish, while it lies in the middle:
Which is easiest to do,
Undish-cover the fish, or dish-cover the riddle?

-48-

Hush-a-by, Lady

[Listen] [XML] [PDF]

music

Hush-a-by, lady, in Alice's lap!
Till the feast's ready we've time for a nap:
When the feast's over we'll go to the ball—
Red Queen, and White Queen, and Alice, and all!





End of the Project Gutenberg EBook of Songs From Alice in Wonderland and
Through the Looking-Glass, by Lewis Carroll

*** END OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SONGS FROM ALICE IN WONDERLAND ***

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Cantoni.


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